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So, by now you may have seen the news.  We were stoked on Tuesday to announce former Facebook executive Chris Kelly has joined our Foundation’s Board of Directors while the former U.S. CTO Aneesh Chopra has joined as a strategic adviser.  Today, I want to share some more about what this means for us, and […]

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Many of you are learning the news, and its true: our Foundation’s name is changing, but the mission remains the same.  Here’s the story. I’d like to officially introduce you all to our new name: the Open Source Election Technology Foundation, or as we’re referring to it, the “OSET Foundation” (“Oh-Set”).  And if you haven’t […]

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Heartbleed is the latest high-profile consumer Internet security  issue, only a few weeks after the “Goto Fail” incident. Both are recently discovered weaknesses in the way that browsers and Web sites interact. In both cases and others, I’ve seen several comments that connect these security issues with Internet voting. But because Heartbleed is pretty darn wicked, I can’t not […]

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(My thanks to a security colleague Matt Bishop who offered this excellent rant (his term not mine!) on Heartbleed and what we can learn from it, and the connection to open source. You can read riff on it here.) “First, the Heartbleed vulnerability isn’t a virus; you can’t be infected by it. It’s a programming error in one […]

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…not much we think. Yesterday’s news of Microsoft co-founder billionaire Paul Allen’s investing $40M in the Spanish election technology company Scytl is validation that elections remain a backwater of innovation in the digital age. But it is not validation that there is a viable commercial market for voting systems of the size typically attracting venture capitalists; the […]

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The TrustTheVote Project Core Team has been hard at work on the Alpha version of VoteStream, our election results reporting technology. They recently wrapped up a prototype phase funded by the Knight Foundation, and then forged ahead a bit, to incorporate data from additional counties, provided by by participating state or local election officials after […]

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LA County CA is the mother of all election complexities, and the data wrangling was intense, even compared to the hardly simple efforts that I reported on previously. There are over 32,000 distinct voting regions, which I think is more than the number of seats, ridings, chairs, and so on, for every federal or state […]

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Congratulations if you are reading this post, after having even glanced at the predecessor about Ramsey County data wrangling – one of the longer and geekier posts in recent times at TrustTheVote. There is a similar but shorter story about our work with Travis County Texas. As with Ramsey, we started with a bunch of stuff […]

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Next up are several overdue reports on data wrangling of county level election data, that is, working with election officials to get legacy data needed for election results; and then putting the data into practical use. It’s where we write software to chew up whatever data we get, put it in a backend system, re-arrange […]

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Alaska’s extension to its iVoting venture may have raised the interests of at least one journalist for one highly visible publication.  When we were asked for our “take” on this form of iVoting, we thought that we should also comment here on this “northern exposed adventure.” (apologies to those fans of the mid-90s wacky TV […]

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